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Civil War Historic Markers Across Georgia

The Civil War in Georgia as told by its historic markers.

 



Mud Creek Line

Beginning on 1864/06/17 and ending 1864/06/19


When Hardee´s Corps fell back from Pine Mountain to Mud Creek, the confederate line formed a right angle where Walkers Division of Hardee;s Corp meet Samuel French´s Division of Polk´s Corps. Union forces under Colonel Frederick Barleson´s 26th Ohio, 57th Indiana and the 100th Illinois [1], attacking during a heavy rainstorm, drove Walkers skirmishers from the high ground near the Latimer House. From this position, the Federal forces were able to establish crossfire of artillery and rifle fire enfilading the confederate lines. Knowing that his forces could not withstand this punishing fire for long, General Johnston ordered a new line to be established at Kennesaw Mountain. This line would not be ready until the 19th, so until that time the confederates had to hold. On the night of June 18, Johnston pulled his forces back to the 3rd and finial Kennesaw line. [2]


The south end of the Mud Creek line was anchored by a battery on a bluff overlooking the Dallas-Marietta Road where it crossed Mud Creek. Captain Giles J. Cockerill, Battery D, 1st Ohio Artillery gained a position on a hill of approximately the same elevation as the confederates. With just the muzzles of his guns above the crest of the hill, the two sides exchanged fire for an hour. The Confederate guns where soon silenced and the fort was in ruins. During this action, Colonel Lucius Polk, nephew of General Polk was seriously wounded and permanently disabled. [3]



 

 

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Start Date
06/17/1864
End Date
06/19/1864

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Historic Markers Across Georgia - Civil War in GA

Mud Creek Line


Excerpt from the report written by Brig. Gen. George D. Wagner, U. S. Army, commanding Second Brigade.


During the night of the 14th instant the enemy retired from their works and at 4.30 o'clock the following morning my skirmishers advanced and took possession of them. Advancing cautiously we soon developed the enemy, strongly intrenched in his new position. My brigade was formed in column of regiments in mass, supported by General Kimball's brigade, Harker having three regiments deployed as skirmishers in my front. We found the enemy too strongly intrenched behind works that had been constructed for some time, to be attacked with reasonable hope of success. I immediately threw up works, where I remained that night and until evening of the next day, when we advanced our lines, driving in the enemy's skirmishers, throwing up barricades within easy musket range of the enemy's main works. The night of the 16th instant the enemy again evacuated their works, which we occupied early on the morning of the 17th, when pushing forward we found the enemy again strongly fortified behind heavy works. The Ninety-seventh Ohio Volunteers, and the Twenty-eighth Kentucky Volunteers, under the command of Col. John Q. Lane, Ninety-seventh Ohio Volunteers, were deployed as skirmishers, and gallantly charged the enemy's skirmish-pits, capturing a number of prisoners, and maintained their position under a continuous and heavy musketry fire from the enemy's main line of works during the night. The loss of the Ninety-seventh Ohio Volunteers in the charge was 9 enlisted men wounded; that of the Twenty-eighth Kentucky Volunteers, 4 enlisted men killed and 12 wounded. The regiments were relieved on the following morning by the Twenty-sixth Ohio Volunteers, Fifty-seventh Indiana Volunteers, and One hundredth Illinois Volunteers, under command of Colonel Bartleson, One hundredth Illinois Volunteers, who was ordered to charge and take the enemy's main line of works, if possible. This charge was made during one of the most terrific rain storms of the season, and, notwithstanding the men were compelled to wade two creeks, both of which were waist deep, under a terrible fire from the enemy, they succeeded in taking the works, capturing a number of prisoners, and driving the enemy to their rear line of works. Colonel Bartleson notified me that his left was in danger, having no connection, and being enfiladed. I ordered up the remainder of the brigade, sending Captain Tinney, assistant adjutant-general, with the Fortieth Indiana Volunteers to the left of the line, asked and obtained a regiment, the Third Kentucky Volunteers, from General Harker, which made the connection complete with General Baird. My entire line was within easy musket-range of the enemy, who kept up a heavy and incessant fire upon us from artillery and infantry when we would slacken our fire sufficient for them to look over their works. It was, therefore, necessary for our own safety to keep up a constant fire, and; thus keep the enemy down In their works, and away from their artillery. In this charge my brigade sustained a loss of 1 commissioned officer and 13 enlisted men killed, and 8 commissioned officers and 86 enlisted men wounded. Lieut. Benjamin F. Beitzell, the officer killed, was a gallant and meritorious officer and his loss deeply felt by his regiment and regretted by the entire command. My command maintained its position until after dark, when I was relieved by General Kimball's brigade. The enemy evacuated their works during the night of the 18th, and at 7 o'clock the following morning my command moved out to join in the pursuit. Moving forward the distance of a mile, the enemy were again found strongly intrenched at the base of Kenesaw Mountain.


Excerpt from the report written by Brig. Gen. Jacob D. Cox, U. S. Army, commanding Third Division.


June 17, the enemy evacuated their works during the night. The division was ordered forward on Sandtown road, Reilly's brigade in advance, supported by Cameron's, Barter's and Byrd's in reserve. (General McLean-relieved this day at his own request, and Colonel Byrd, First Tennessee Infantry, assumed command of the brigade by seniority). The enemy's cavalry rear guard was pushed back with lively skirmishing to the forks of the Marietta and Sandtown roads, near Darby's, where the left of the enemy was found in a strong position behind Mud Creek; Cockerill's battery (D, of the First Ohio Regiment), supported by Reilly's and Cameron's brigades, opened upon them from a hill on the left of the road, and a fierce artillery fight was kept up for two hours. Reilly and Cameron intrenched their position facing Mud Creek, Barter was put in on the right of Cameron, Byrd's brigade being held in reserve and Hascall's division being in reserve on my right. The Twentieth Corps connected on the left, and established and. opened two batteries on the enemy's position in our front. A. very heavy rain; lasting through the next day, prevented further movements, and the rebels evacuated the works in the night of the 18th.



References

  1. THE WAR OF THE REBELLION: OFFICAL RECORDS OF THE UNION AND CONFEDERATE ARMIES; Published under the direction of the Secretary of War. Washington: Government Printing Office; 1890-91. Series I, Volume 38, Part 1, O.R. No. 41, p 325 - 334 - 345
  2. THE WAR OF THE REBELLION: OFFICAL RECORDS OF THE UNION AND CONFEDERATE ARMIES; Published under the direction of the Secretary of War. Washington: Government Printing Office; 1890-91. Series I, Volume 38, Part 1, O.R. No. 41 , p 325 - 334 - 345
      •Philip L. Secrist; Sherman´s 1864 Trail of Battles to Atlanta; Mercer University Press©2006, Chapter 18; pp 113 - 116
      •Marietta Country Club - Historic Marker - Civil War Action Around Latimer's Farm  Marietta Country Club - Historic Marker - Civil War Action Around Latimer's Farm
  3. THE WAR OF THE REBELLION: OFFICAL RECORDS OF THE UNION AND CONFEDERATE ARMIES; Published under the direction of the Secretary of War. Washington: Government Printing Office; 1890-91. Series I, Volume 38, Part 1, O.R. No. 41 , p 325 - 334 - 345
      •Philip L. Secrist; Sherman´s 1864 Trail of Battles to Atlanta; Mercer University Press©2006, Chapter 18; pp 113 - 116
      •GA Historic Marker - Mud Creek Line - GHM 033-06 GA Historic Marker - Mud Creek Line - GHM 033-06
      •GA Historic Marker - Darby Plantation - GMH GHM 033-07 GA Historic Marker - Darby Plantation - GHM 033-07

 

 

Links to Civil War Historic Markers Across Georgia.

 

Civil War Action Around Latimer's Farm
Darby Plantation
Mud Creek Line
Site of the Dickson House - June 15, 1864