Historic Markers Across Georgia



Cathedral of St. John the Baptist



Marker ID: GHS 25-28
Location: Abercorn Street, just North of the Harris Street Intersection.
County: Chatham
Coordinates: N 32° 04.41096    W 081° 05.4777
  32.073516    -81.091295
Style: Free Standing **
Waymark: WM4M3T
Cathedral of St. John the Baptist Marker  



Text:

Cathedral of St. John the Baptist



Military earthworks, also variously called redoubts, lunettes, entrenchments and breastworks, have been used for centuries as points of lookout and defense. Early in the Civil War, soldiers learned to dig a simple trench behind an earthen parapet from which they could fire upon the enemy. When the lunette earthwork before you was built in 1864, logs, planks, brush, sandbags or stones were added to build up the parapet.

In April 1864, Confederate Major General Howell Cobb set up his headquarters at Macon and organized a reserve force of about 2,500 men. Most were too young or too old to fight on the front or worked in Macon's numerous armament factories. By summer, the Georgia Reserves and slave labor began constructing a system of defenses around the city. It was to include a dozen dirt forts, with rifle pits and artillery positions where cannon could be placed. Yet by the fall Cobb expressed frustration with the lack of available wagons and mule teams to aid in the construction. He also complained about his inability to obtain and to pay a sufficient number of laborers. Cobb wrote, "At present we have large numbers of Negroes employed and as far as I know, not the first (step) taken to provide for the payment of the hands."

The congregation of St. John the Baptist formed in the late eighteenth century when French émigrés fleeing revolutions in France and Haiti found refuge in Savannah. The Church of St. John the Baptist became a cathedral in 1850 when the Diocese of Savannah was established with the Right Reverend Francis X. Gartland as its first bishop. The Cathedral was dedicated at this site on April 30, 1876. A fire in 1898 destroyed much of the structure. It was quickly rebuilt and opened again in 1900. Another major restoration took place in 2000. Today it is a place of worship and seat of the diocese that includes ninety counties in southern Georgia.





2007.7 Erected by the Georgia Historical Society and the
Parish Council, Cathedral of St. John the Baptist
25-28



 
Cathedral of St. John the Baptist
Cathedral of St. John the Baptist


 

025-HS28b