Historic Markers Across Georgia



Reconstruction Property Rights



Marker ID: MCBC 
Location: at the Morgan County African American Museum at 156 Academy St. across from intersection with Burnett St., Madison
County: Morgan
Coordinates: N 33° 35.754    W 083° 28.198
  33.5959    -83.46996666
Style: Free Standing **
Waymark: WM6T3X
Reconstruction Property Rights Marker  



Text:

Georgia´s General Assembly of 1865-1866 passed important property rights laws for its black population, most of whom had recently been emancipated. Blacks could legally buy, sell, inherit, and lease both land and personal property. The experience of John Wesley Moore (1862-1908) serves as an example of emerging African-American property ownership.

As a farmhand for James A. Fannin, Moore likely established his household on the Fannin Farm. In less than a decade, he acquired 9 acres of his own. Fannin, a bachelor, later deeded 41 acres to Moore "in consideration of the service he has given me." Circa 1900, Moore built a home on his farm and left his widow 67 acres free and clear upon his death.

In 1989, Rev. Alfred Muray acquired the Moore farm two miles south of town and donated the house for relocation. With leadership from the Honorable Martin L. Bass, Jr., and Rev. Fred Perriman, the house was restored for the Morgan County African-American Museum to serve as a center for the preservation and celebration of black heritage and culture.



CITY OF MADISON BICENTENNIAL COMMISSION 1809-2009
A PRESERVE AMERICA COMMUNITY



 

 

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