Historic Markers Across Alabama



City of Guin



Marker ID: ABT 
Location: US 278, city park, Guin, AL
County: Marion
Coordinates: N 33° 57.945    W 087° 54.880
  33.96575    -87.91466666
Style: Free Standing **
Waymark: WMPXQA
 



Text:

CITY OF GUIN, ALABAMA-THE EARLY YEARS


In 1889 Dr. Jeremiah Guin gave land to the Kansas City, Missouri & Birmingham Railroad to allow completion of its Memphis to Birmingham railway. The rails connected at Dr. Guin's farm, about 1/4 mile west of the present RR crossing, with a ceremonial golden spike being driven to commemorate the occasion. A flagstop (depot) called Guin was established and soon thereafter 32 citizens petitioned the Alabama Legislature for incorporation of a town. A depot was operated until the 1960's, and was the site where many local soldiers boarded trains to fight in WWI, WWII and the Korean War. The Town of Guin, incorporated on December 30, 1889, initially had about 350 citizens, 13 storehouses, 4 hotels, 2 cotton yards and a livery stable. In coming years, Guin became home for Marion County's first High School, Bank, Automobile dealership and America's first combined Senior Center/Disaster Shelter facility with the Collins Life Center.


THE STORMS OF 1974


On April 3, 1974 the Guin area was struck by an outbreak of violent tornadoes which still rank among the most severe in recorded history. The tornado which struck downtown Guin was classified as an F5 super cell tornado registering winds of up to 250 miles per hour. Twenty-three local people lost their lives that night and hundreds more were injured. About 2000 residents were left homeless from the total loss of 221 homes and partial damage to 158 more. Guin's business district was flattened, with 56 businesses, its hospital, City Hall and rural electric office all sustaining damage. The Baptist, Church of Christ and Methodist Churches were also demolished. In the months after the storm, the Alabama National Guard, U.S. Small Business, H.U.D. Administration, American Red Cross and thousands of volunteers from all over America poured into Guin to assist in the re-building effort.








End of City of Guin