Historic Markers Across Alabama



Johnson Center for the Arts



Marker ID: ABT 
Location:
County: Pike
Coordinates:   
Waymark: None
 



Text:

Side 1:
Chiseled in the cornerstone of the historic U.S. Post Office in Troy,Alabama are the words Franklin MacVeagh, Secretary of the Treasury, James Knox Taylor, Supervising Architect, MCMX. Troy, Alabama’s historic treasure, a classical-revival style post office, circa 1910, located just off the square in downtown Troy, has been resurrected through the Arts.

In 2000, empty and on the verge of deterioration, the elegant building about to reach its 100th birthday was saved. Through the efforts of the Pike County Chamber of Commerce and a dedicated group of local citizens, a commitment was made to incorporate, purchase the building, gain 501(c)(3)status and mount a fundraising campaign to renovate the facility. Thus, the Troy-Pike Cultural Arts Center, Inc., was born; its goal being is to transform the facility into a dynamic cultural arts center serving Troy, Pike County and this entire area of the state; its mission is Cultural Enrichment of the Lives of all Citizens Through Exposure to the Arts.


Side 2:
The project received a tremendous boost in 2005 when Troy natives, Dr. and Mrs. Manley Johnson named the facility The Holman and Ethel Johnson Center for the Arts for his parents. Local commitment was strong early on and continues to be an integral part of the success of this project. Renovations on the facility began in July 2007 and will be completed in May 2008. The Holman & Ethel Johnson Center for the Arts boasts seven galleries, including the two-story, 1400 sq. ft. Main Gallery. The opening of the Holman & Ethel Johnson Center for the Arts, with its environmentally controlled atmosphere, will allow for high-quality exhibitions to be brought in from around the country and the world that will provide educational and aesthetic benefits for all ages of the surrounding community.




Notes:

Note: the title of this marker may actually be “The Historic Troy Post Office - (Circa 1910)”



End of Johnson Center for the Arts