Historic Markers Across Alabama



Glennville



Marker ID: HCC 
Location: on U.S. 431, Glennville, Alabama
County: Russell
Coordinates: N 32° 7.593    W 085° 10.601
  32.12655    -85.17668333
Style: Free Standing **
Waymark: None
 



Text:

SIDE 1:
One of the earliest white settlements in the Old Creek Indian Nation. James Elizabeth Glenn, who named the town, and his brother Thompson Glenn, arrived here in 1835 only to have to evacuate during the Indian uprisings of 1836, at which time all buildings were destroyed and the remaining settlers killed. Thompson Glenn is credited with effecting the removal, to Columbus Georgia, of the entrapped white citizens of nearby Roanoke, Georgia, during the same uprising. Glennville was resettled upon the removal of the Indians. It rapidly attracted settlers and their social and cultural standards caused Glennville to be known as "The Athens of the South."

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Russell County Historical Commission, 1980.
Located thirteen miles south of Seale on U.S. Highway 431, Glennville, Alabama.

SIDE 2:
At its apex this town had collegiate institutes, finishing schools, a military academy, classic churches and stately homes. In 1854 John Bowles Glenn left here to establish a school at Auburn and became its first president of the board of trustees. This school in successive changes became Auburn University. Glennville was the home of the only known lynch mob that bought a newspaper advertisement, acknowledged the deed and published their names. The victim, a convicted murderer, was a member of a prominent Barbour county white family. The incidents brought national attention to the town. The failure to accept a railroad, seen as "an intrusion on their way of living," proved to be the herald of the town's demise.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Russell County Historical Commission, 1980.
Located thirteen miles south of Seale on U.S. Highway 431, Glennville, Alabama.



Notes:

Marker Dedication or Erection Date: 1980




End of Glennville