Historic Markers Across Alabama



James Cantey



Marker ID: HCC 
Location: on Alabama Highway 165, eight miles south of Phenix City, Alabama, at Fort Mitchell.
County: Russell
Coordinates: N 32° 20.82    W 085° 1.146
  32.347    -85.0191
Style: Free Standing **
Waymark: WMNJMQ
 



Text:

SIDE 1:
Near here was the home of Confederate Brigadier General James Cantey who arrived in 1849 to operate a plantation owned by his father. Prior to coming to Russell County he had practiced law at his birthplace, Camden, South Carolina, and had represented his district in the State Legislature thee for two terms. Cantey fought in the Mexican War and received near mortal wounds. He was left among the dead but was rescued by his body servant whose plans were to bear him home for burial. The slave's detection of a faint sign of life caused heroic action that revived his master. For this deed the servant was offered his freedom, which was refused.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Russell County Historical Commission, 1980.


SIDE 2:
General Cantey was married in 1858 at Fort Mitchell to Mary Elizabeth Benton, niece of Colonel John Crowell, Alabama's first Congressman. At the beginning of the War Between the States he organized "Cantey’s Rifles" in what was then the 15th Alabama Regiment. He served throughout the War and surrendered with Joseph E. Johnston at Durham Station, North Carolina, April 26, 1865. The first chapter of the United Daughters of the confederacy in Russell County, organized at Seale, was named in his honor. General Cantey was born December 30, 1818, and died June 30, 1874. He is interred in a family cemetery at Fort Mitchell.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Russell County Historical Commission, 1980.



Notes:

Marker Dedication or Erection Date: 1890




End of James Cantey