Historic Markers Across Alabama



Sand Fort / Site of Royston's Inn



Marker ID: HCC 
Location:
County: Russell
Coordinates:   
Waymark: None
 



Text:

SAND FORT


Nearby by was the Sand Fort, built by the Georgia militia in 1814 and used by U.S. Troops in 1836. Strategically located on the Federal Road, it served as a defense against the uprisings of the Creek Indians and protected Royston's Inn, a stop on the road. By 1841 a post office was established with Robert Allen as postmaster. The community and nearby area prospered and in 1850 included home of the Gallups, Chadwick, and Bush families. The post office closed in 1866 and the community declined due to the social and economic changes of the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and Russell County Historical Commission 1988.


SITE OF ROYSTON’S INN


As early as 1830 one Mr. Royston operated a tavern on the Federal Road near here. Besieged during the 1836 hostilities, Royston defended his inn alone. He was so closely watched that he could not get water from a nearby spring. He had none to drink or to make bread from the meal of which he had plenty. Royston did, however, have a keg of whiskey. The legend was repeated long afterward that he used the whiskey both to drink and to mix the corn bread on which he subsisted for almost two weeks until the siege was over.

Erected by the Historic Chattahoochee Commission and Russell County Historical Commission 1988.




Notes:

Marker Dedication or Erection Date: 1988




End of Sand Fort / Site of Royston's Inn