Historic Markers Across Florida



Thomas Alva Edison



Marker ID:  
Location: 2350 McGregor Blvd, Fort Myers, FL
County: Lee
Coordinates: N 26° 38.024    W 081° 52.781
  26.63373333    -81.87968333
Style: Interpretative Sign **
Waymark: None
 



Text:

Thomas Alva Edison
February 11, 1847 – October 18, 1931



Named the 20th century “Man of the Millennium” by LIFE Magazine, Thomas Alva Edison is best known for perfecting a commercially viable incandescent light bulb. However, Edison was also a newspaper printer, telegrapher, inventor, businessman, boss, husband, father and friend.

During his remarkable career, Edison was awarded 1,093 United States patents and is the only person granted a patent every year for 65 consecutive years. His purpose for invention was to “transform middle class life.” He discovered an astounding number of commercial applications for ordinary materials and agricultural products. Although his favorite invention was the phonograph, his work spanned improvements to the telegraph, light bulb, generator and motors, movie-making, batteries, cement, and a domestic source of rubber, one of his primary research focuses in southwest Florida.

From his first visit in 1885 to his last stay in Fort Myers in 1931, Edison created a remarkable estate that included areas for his research, as well as family and social actives. His love of Florida included pastimes like fishing, boating, reading, trip to town, and exploring the tropical paradise that Edison affectionately referred to as his “Eden”.

Edison's famous quote, “there is only one Fort Myers and soon 90 million Americans will discover it” has proven true, for thousands of national, international and Florida residents visit the Edison & Ford Winter Estates every year.

This statue of Thomas Edison was donated by Estates patron Darilyn Alderman and created by sculptor D.J. Wilkins in 2004.


A picture of this marker can be found on HMDB.org


Notes:

More information:
Edison & Ford Winter Estates
Thomas Edison - Thomas Edison
Wikipedia - Thomas Edison
History.com - Henry Ford
Wikipedia - Henry Ford