Historic Markers Across South Carolina



Waverly Five and Dime / George Elmore and Elmore V. Rice



Marker ID: SCHM 40-145
Location: 2317 Gervais St., Columbia, SC
County: Richland
Coordinates:   
Style: Free Standing **
 



Text:

WAVERLY FIVE AND DIME

The Waverly Five & Dime, located here until about 1957, was managed 1945-48 by George A. Elmore (1905-1959), the African American plaintiff in a landmark voting rights case soon after World War II. Elmore ran this store and two liquor stores, and also worked as a photographer and cab driver. In 1946, when he tried to vote in the all-white Democratic primary in Richland County, he was denied a ballot.

GEORGE ELMORE AND ELMORE V. RICE

In 1947 the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) sued to end the all-white primary in S.C. Judge J. Waties Waring (1880-1948) ruled in U.S. district court that it was “time for S.C. to rejoin the Union.” Blacks voted in the next S.C. primary, in 1948. As a result of the case, George Elmore endured numerous personal threats and economic reprisals that ruined his business.

Erected by the Historic Columbia Foundation, the City of Columbia, and the S.C. Department of Transportation, 2008



Notes:

Explore more:
Wikipedia - List of African American historic places in South Carolina
Wikipedia - NAACP